4 things a new-look Conservative party might mean for property

The Prime Minister’s resignation, a high-profile sacking and a raft of new appointments have given the ruling Conservative party a brand new look.

New faces in the Government’s housing departments come at a critical time for the property industry, with a number of new rules, regulations and laws waiting to come into force. The sacking of Michael Gove was the start of a completely different MP line-up, with the outgoing Secretary of State for the Department for Levelling Up, Housing and Communities (DLUHC) replaced by Greg Clark.

In addition, Marcus Jones has been installed as the new Housing Minister after the resignation of Stuart Andrew, while Lord Greenhalgh, the representative responsible for overseeing the DLUHC’s business in the House of Lords, also handed in his notice.

While the ministerial changes are part of a wider bid to freshen up the Conservative party ahead of a possible snap general election, there could be imminent changes to the way we buy, sell, rent and invest in property as a result. Here are four watchpoints for the property market:-

  1. The Renters’ Reform Bill may be delayed: the property industry is rumbling with rumours of a delay to the much-hyped Renters’ Reform Bill. With Gove, the initiative’s creator, now out of the picture and Parliament’s summer recess pending, any new laws and regulations may be reconsidered or implemented at a later date. We’ll monitor the situation and relay any updates as soon as they happen.
  2. Cladding is Greg Clark’s priority: in his first media address since his appointment as the DLUHC head, Clark confirmed expediting a solution to the UK’s cladding crisis was the top of his agenda. He has given major housebuilders a four-week deadline to sign up to remediation work contracts, giving hope to property owners whose cladding has been deemed unsafe. Where other new property laws sit on his agenda remains to be seen.
  3. Uncertainty over part II of leasehold reforms: while part one of the Government’s leasehold reforms are in place – with newly-created leases now free of ground rent – doubt has been cast over how quickly part two will come into effect. While Lord Greenhalgh reconfirmed that reforms to make it cheaper and easier for existing leases to be extended to 990 years with zero ground rent would happen, his exit puts a question mark on how quickly phase two of the reforms will be introduced.
  4. The number of new homes built should rise: there is good news for fans of new build homes – and for all home movers who’d like to see a more fluid property market with more stock. Clark has declared a resetting of the Government’s relationship with housebuilders so they are more free to build more properties. Encouragingly, conversations with the House Builders’ Federation are already underway.

For now, the property market continues as normal. Please contact us if you are ready to sell or let your property.

Add value with these garden additions

The topic of adding value to a property is something extensively covered in the press but not every suggestion you read about is practical, affordable or enjoyable. What if, however, there were a number of ways to add value with items you may already be thinking about buying or installing this summer?

Look no further than your garden. It won’t have escaped your notice that outside space on its own is one of the best ‘added value’ aspects of property, with a well-kept garden widely believed to add between 10% and 20% to a home’s value.

A recent piece of research by Roofing Megastore set out to identify the garden facets that added the most value to a property. While some of the most substantial and permanent garden improvements see the biggest returns (adding a conservatory, a home office garden room, a gym/studio or an orangery will result in the most value, all increasing a property’s price by at least £6,500), there are a number of more modest and on-trend additions with surprising returns.

If you’re determined to make the most of your garden this summer before going on the market, you may like to consider this year’s al fresco must-have – the outdoor kitchen. Having a dedicated place to cook outside can add £6,385 to your home’s value and if you look up ‘outdoor kitchen hacks’ online, you’ll find some budget-friendly tips, tricks and DIY solutions.

Also bringing joy this summer and adding value at the same time is the hot tub (+£5,752); a garden bar (+£5,624); a built-in pizza oven (+£5,135) and a built-in outdoor BBQ (+£5,135). The research also found a new paved patio, a new decking area, a children’s treehouse, a greenhouse, and mature plants, trees and flowers all added more than £5,000 in value.

On the last point, even your choice of plants can create an uplift to your property’s price. GetAgent teamed up with gardener Craig Wilson from Gardener’s Dream to identify what plants add the most pounds. If you’re potting up tubs or sprucing up borders, Wilson says hydrangeas, peonies and eucalyptus will add value.

When it comes to devaluing property, there’s one plant that will dent the price and that’s Japanese Knotweed. It’s an invasive species not sold in garden centres but it can spread from neighbouring gardens, sidings and embankments.

If you think you have Japanese Knotweed, you’ll need to call in a registered expert to confirm its presence and treat the plant before you go on the market. If you don’t and Japanese Knotweed is identified in your survey report, a buyer may find it problematic to get a mortgage on your property.

Gardens really do hold great appeal, so sellers should pay attention to lawns, beds, borders and furniture. If you’d like advice about how to present your garden ahead of a sale, please get in touch.

Landlords: 6 thing landlords need to know about the Fairer Private Rented Sector White Paper

Landlords and tenants will soon see changes to how tenancies are run, thanks to incoming legislation changes enforced by the Government. Letting agents across the country are digesting the contents of the new Fairer Private Rented Sector White Paper.

Our role is to support landlords in implementing what’s new, ensuring their buy-to-lets are legally compliant at all times. Ahead of the White Paper contents becoming law, we summarise the key points that need considering now:-

1. Changes to tenancy types & evictions 

The Fairer Private Rented Sector White Paper confirms the intention to scrap Section 21 ‘no fault’ evictions. Landlords will need a reason from a set list in order to end a tenancy lawfully, rather than simply tell tenants to leave with no reason. It is thought that regaining a property for the landlord to live in or sell on will be one of the acceptable reasons soon to be defined in law.

There are, however, addendums to this incoming reform. There will be improvements to the eviction process, in favour of the landlord, where the tenant is frequently involved in anti-social behaviour or is in rent arrears. On the flipside, it will be easier for renters to walk away from a tenancy agreement as fixed term tenancies will be banned. In their place, all tenancy agreements will be issued on a periodic basis, leaving tenants freer to leave a property when they wish.

2. Discrimination against some rental groups will end

Landlords have been able to exclude some groups from renting their property but this will come to an end. The White Paper will forbid landlords from making blanket bans on renters with children and tenants who receive benefits. All tenants, however, will still have to meet the landlord’s pre-set criteria and pass the referencing process.

In addition, all tenants will be able to request a pet move in with them, which the landlord must think about and cannot unreasonably refuse. To make this an easier law for landlords to embrace, the landlord can insist that the tenant has specific pet insurance.

3. Rent rises will be capped to once a year

Rent rises are unavoidable but to make it fairer for tenants, the notice period landlords give renters will double. In addition, the frequency at which rent rises can be applied will be capped to once a year. It is thought landlords wishing to increase the rent will have to use a Section 13 notice to do so or insert a rent review clause into the period agreement.

4. Living conditions will be standardised

The Government’s concerns over health and safety in private rented properties will be addressed by a new Decent Homes Standard. This already operates in the social housing sector but it will apply to all privately rented homes for the first time as part of the reforms. The Decent Homes Standard will run alongside the Landlord & Tenant Act 1985, and the Homes (Fitness for Human Habitation) Act 2018.

5. A new private renters’ ombudsman will be set up

Calls for specific housing courts have been dismissed at this stage but a new private renters’ ombudsman will be created instead. The aim will be for an impartial body to resolve disputes between tenants and landlords, without the need to go to court. Issues, such as disagreeing over deposit deductions and rent rises, will be settled without high-level judicial involvement.

6. A new advice & information portal will be launched

With hundreds of rules, regulations and now new laws for landlords to comply with, the Government will create a single online portal for landlords, listing every compliance item, together with useful property set-up and management advice. It is not known as yet whether it will be mandatory for landlords to register with the portal.

We are working to advise our landlords on how the Fairer Private Rented Sector White Paper will affect current tenancies and future buy-to-lets. You can contact us for tailored lettings advice and to discuss any aspect of the rental reforms.

Self-care crosses over into the home

Self-care’ is a concept that’s gained momentum in the last two years, especially as we look to rebalance our lives after the pandemic. Although what may immediately spring to mind is a walk in the countryside or an hour-long aromatherapy massage, the self-care trend has crossed over into our homes.

A new study has shown how self-care is shaping where we live. Not On The High Street recently questioned Brits on the matter of what it calls ‘self spaces’ – rooms devoted to self-care, hobbies or leisure activities.

The study found people in 2022 wanted to enjoy more ‘me time’ (68%), maintain a better work/life balance (58%) and spend more time on hobbies (66%). As a result, many were thinking about creating a room in their home dedicated to their passions and more holistic past-times. In fact, research revealed over a third of us have already designated a space where we can practice a form of self-care – not surprising when 7 in 10 people said they felt most relaxed while at home.

This rising interior trend is already having an effect on the property market. Almost half (48%) of those taking part in the research said a self-care room would be a priority when looking for their next home.

To quantify just how important self-care has become, Not On The High Street asked people what was most essential within the home. It found some Brits felt a self-care room was more important than a new kitchen (38%), a new en-suite bathroom (39%), a new living room (37%) or a new garden (37%).

According to the online retailer, our top 10 self-care spaces are:

  1.     Reading corner (16%)
  2.     Gym (16%)
  3.     Walk in wardrobe (14%)
  4.     Cinema room (14%)
  5.     ‘Man cave’ (14%)
  6.     Music room (13%)
  7.     Arts and crafts studio (12%)
  8.     Gaming room (12 %)
  9.     Study room (11%)
  10.     Mini library (10%)

Stay flexible when it comes to self-care

Interior trends come and go, so before you rush out to reconfigure your property or install permanent pieces of gym equipment, think about how versatile the room could be, especially when it comes to selling or renting out your property in the future.

Retaining flexibility can be achieved by using freestanding furniture that isn’t screwed or nailed down; using screens to divide rooms on a temporary basis; opting for multi-purpose furniture, such as a snooker table that converts into a dining table, and keeping the décor neutral.

Easy self-care ideas to introduce

Adding an element of self-care to your day doesn’t have to involve a dedicated room. Why not try one of these small-scale ideas instead?

  • Encourage a spa-like ambience in your bathroom: clear away empty toiletry bottles, buy a fresh set of fluffy towels and light candles instead of turning on a harsh overhead light.
  • Find bedroom bliss: banish the TV from the bedroom and instead, play a soothing soundtrack of music you may hear when going for a massage.
  • Create a reading corner: just add a comfy chair, a side table for your coffee, a freestanding lamp and a pile of classic novels.
  •  Install a window seat: if you have a window with a view, think about installing a window seat as there’s something meditative about simply watching the world go by.
  • Make a mindfulness zone: clear clutter and minimise distractions to create a place to practice mindfulness or meditation.

If you are searching for a new home and a self-care space is on your ‘most wanted’ list, talk to us about available properties.

Property positives & negatives: what puts buyers off?

For many, selling up represents a decision to leave a property that the owner has invested time and money into making it a home. Others, however, may have fallen out of love with where they live, letting it get a little ‘rough around the edges.’

Like or loathe your current home, it’s not the opinion of the seller that counts. As soon as that ‘for sale’ sign is up, all that matters is what buyers think about the property and how much they’re willing to pay to make it theirs.

New research from Tapi was commissioned to establish the top five negatives that put potential purchasers off. It’s a study that has been carried out numerous times by different people but after the last two years and many people making lifestyle changes, it’s good to get a fresh perspective on what may scupper a property sale.

The research found a home that needed a lot of work doing to it was the most off-putting aspect, with 45% of those taking part in the research saying they’d pass on a property if it needed too much modernising or maintenance.

On a similar theme, 22% of participants commented that they’d discount a property that needed complete redecoration, while 28% would be deterred if the home had an old kitchen that needed replacing.

The other two aspects in the top five property negatives really fall outside of the seller’s control. Purchasers value their peace and quiet, with 43% of respondents saying they’d snub a property if there was a lot of external noise pollution. Completing the list was unsightly surroundings in eye view of the property – a negative cited by 36% of people.

Rather than dwelling exclusively on the adverse, the study also asked what people found most attractive when looking for a new home. Unsurprisingly, more than half of Brits (52%) said private outdoor space was the most important factor when searching for a new home.

Just behind a garden or a balcony was a new kitchen, with 51% saying this was a top consideration when looking for a property to buy. Another feature that finds favour with home movers is a new bathroom, with 42% of respondents saying this was very important to them. Other property plus points included freshly painted walls (20%), new flooring (15%), modern appliances (12%) and neutral colours (19%).

Before you rush out to buy a new kitchen or rip out your bathroom, talk to us about the financial investment needed to make improvements versus the actual value and appeal it will add to your property. Sometimes the simplest (and cheapest) alterations, such as tidying the garden and repainting throughout in white, can make all the difference. Contact us for free advice and a property valuation.

Property positives & negatives: what puts buyers off?

For many, selling up represents a decision to leave a property that the owner has invested time and money into making it a home. Others, however, may have fallen out of love with where they live, letting it get a little ‘rough around the edges.’

Like or loathe your current home, it’s not the opinion of the seller that counts. As soon as that ‘for sale’ sign is up, all that matters is what buyers think about the property and how much they’re willing to pay to make it theirs.

New research from Tapi was commissioned to establish the top five negatives that put potential purchasers off. It’s a study that has been carried out numerous times by different people but after the last two years and many people making lifestyle changes, it’s good to get a fresh perspective on what may scupper a property sale.

The research found a home that needed a lot of work doing to it was the most off-putting aspect, with 45% of those taking part in the research saying they’d pass on a property if it needed too much modernising or maintenance.

On a similar theme, 22% of participants commented that they’d discount a property that needed complete redecoration, while 28% would be deterred if the home had an old kitchen that needed replacing.

The other two aspects in the top five property negatives really fall outside of the seller’s control. Purchasers value their peace and quiet, with 43% of respondents saying they’d snub a property if there was a lot of external noise pollution. Completing the list was unsightly surroundings in eye view of the property – a negative cited by 36% of people.

Rather than dwelling exclusively on the adverse, the study also asked what people found most attractive when looking for a new home. Unsurprisingly, more than half of Brits (52%) said private outdoor space was the most important factor when searching for a new home.

Just behind a garden or a balcony was a new kitchen, with 51% saying this was a top consideration when looking for a property to buy. Another feature that finds favour with home movers is a new bathroom, with 42% of respondents saying this was very important to them. Other property plus points included freshly painted walls (20%), new flooring (15%), modern appliances (12%) and neutral colours (19%).

Before you rush out to buy a new kitchen or rip out your bathroom, talk to us about the financial investment needed to make improvements versus the actual value and appeal it will add to your property. Sometimes the simplest (and cheapest) alterations, such as tidying the garden and repainting throughout in white, can make all the difference. Contact us for free advice and a property valuation.

June’s property market analysis

We’re almost halfway through 2022 and there is time to reflect on the current property market. Although the interest rate has risen, the impact has yet to hit buyer demand, with buyer numbers still high. Estate agents participating in Propertymark’s latest study reported an average of 100 purchasers registered per branch.

There is, however, a contrast between buyer demand and the number of properties for sale. This recurring theme was illustrated in the same Propertymark study. It found there were 52% fewer properties available in April 2022 compared to the same month in the previous nine years.

Sellers shelling-out over the asking price

Competition between buyers remains fierce – an aspect that should encourage sellers to come to market. As a result of demand, purchasers are willing to bid high to secure a property. In fact, 39% of agents say the majority of their stock sold above asking price.

House prices continue to rise

Rather than a cooling market that property commentators had predicted, the rate at which house prices are climbing accelerated in May. Previously, growth had shown signs of slowing, dropping to 0.3% in April from 1.1% in March.

May, however, saw the growth rate of price rises bounce back. The Nationwide detailed a 0.9% uplift in property values – the tenth month in a row where values had increased. Annual price growth now stands at 11.2%.

Rising property values have also led to a new property record. In May, Zoopla’s house price index revealed the UK’s average house price had topped £250,000 for the first time. Demand that’s 61% over the five-year average and a 37% dip in the number of homes for sale have combined with a willingness to pay over the asking price to create a new average house price of £250,200.

The residential side of agency isn’t the only place to have experienced increases. Goodlord’s May rental index shows that rents rose by 0.83% in May. This results in English tenants paying a new average monthly rent of £1,020. Rents are now 11% more expensive when compared to a year ago.

Potential buyers have two pieces of news to digest this month. The Government stunned the property industry by announcing a change to its Help to Buy scheme. The Government has brought this deadline forward, with Help to Buy purchasers needing to reserve a property before 6pm on 31st October 2022 It had been advertised that reservations needed to be made by December 2022.

There are successors to Help to Buy

The earlier reservation deadline will ensure all sales legally exchange before Help to Buy ends in March 2023. Anyone hoping to buy a new home using the scheme – which allows purchasers to buy a property with a 5% deposit – should not delay their property search. Alternatives still running after Help to Buy ends include the Government-backed mortgage guarantee scheme, shared ownership and First Homes.

Those who are buying a property in the near future are being advised to pay particular attention to their circumstance. A new poll among 940 estate agents looked into who was to blame for sales falling through. Respondents said 46% of collapsed sales were due to problems on the buyer’s side, with 22% saying purchasers further up or down the chain caused issues.

Fallthrough rates remain low

Conveyancers and solicitors, however, didn’t escape the wrath of estate agents. Of those questioned, 17% found it was the legal teams who were behind transactions that failed to complete. Thankfully fallthrough rates are low. Almost 3 out of 4 agents taking part in the research (70%) said fewer than 9% of their sales fell through.

The property sector loves a study and the latest English Private Landlord Survey found 90% of landlords plan to keep renting out their buy-to-lets after their current tenancy agreement expires. When it comes to adding properties to their portfolios, 11% of landlords said they plan to purchase additional buy-to-let.

If you would like to know more about your local property market, please get in touch.

Landlords: your guide to green mortgages

Landlords and tenants can agree on one thing right now: making a rental property more energy efficient is a must. Renters will have rising fuel bills in mind, while landlords will be preparing for changes to minimum EPC ratings. Encouragement to make eco improvements in the rental sector can now be found in the mortgage market, as we explain.

Encouraging more eco efficient homes

Even mortgage lenders have their part to play in our quest to achieve net zero carbon emissions by 2050. The Government has asked banks and building societies to encourage the purchase of eco-efficient properties by offering buyers advantageous products billed as ‘green mortgages’. 

Green mortgages explained

A green mortgage will usually offer better rates of interest and borrowing terms to people who are buying the most energy efficient properties for sale. The home they are buying could be brand new or an older home that has been vastly improved with energy efficient features but, generally, green mortgages are offered to those buying properties where the EPC rating is A, B or C.

Rewarding the intention to go green

As well as preferential products for buyers of properties where the EPC rating is already high, green mortgages are also available to those who pledge to improve an existing property’s energy efficiency, introduced as a way of raising eco standards in the UK’s existing housing stock. Assistance to do this can come in the form of cash back or a higher loan amount with the extra funds covering improvement works.

Green mortgages aren’t just for owner-occupiers

Green mortgages are applicable to everyone buying a property, whether they are a buy-to-let investor or an owner occupier. In fact, green mortgages make the most sense for landlords, as lettings compliance is increasingly focused on improving sustainable standards.

With minimum EPC ratings set to increase from the current E to C for all lets by 2028 – and maybe even a B by 2030 – many landlords may soon automatically qualify for a green mortgage if they are working towards a C EPC rating.

Extra benefits for buy-to-let purchasers

As the number of available green mortgages grows, so does the breadth of help they offer. Buying poorly performing properties isn’t off the cards as there are products designed specifically for investors willing to purchase a property where the EPC rating is D or below.

Lenders are offering bridging loans to landlords who are embarking on eco improvement programmes, with the loan converting to a buy-to-let mortgage once the work is complete. There can be additional discounts for landlords who achieve the highest EPC ratings, prompting them to really make a concerted energy efficient effort.

More choice for investors

A recent report by Mortgages for Business found green mortgages now make up 15% of the buy-to-let home loan market, with over 350 products available. New green mortgages are being introduced all the time, so it’s worth shopping around to find the right product. Talk to us ahead of your next buy-to-let purchase for advice on eco-efficient property investment.

5 things landlords should know about green mortgages

From what was a leftfield way of thinking to a mainstream, everyday goal, going green is an agenda-topping issue in lettings. Green mortgages can help landlords reduce three vital aspects – carbon emissions, fuel bills and mortgage repayments – by incentivising the purchase of the most eco-friendly homes and encouraging the upgrade of the least energy efficient rental stock.

Here are five green mortgage must-knows:-

  1.     Landlords can apply now

Green mortgages, with their more attractive interest rates and borrowing terms, aren’t reserved exclusively for those buying a property to live in themselves. In fact, 15% of the buy-to-let home loan market is devoted to green mortgages, with product numbers at their highest ever level (there were more than 350 green buy-to-let mortgages available as of April 2022).

  1.     The property you’re buying should have a top-end EPC

Green mortgages are offered to buy-to-let investors who are purchasing the most energy efficient properties to rent out. To qualify, there should be an EPC with a rating of A, B or C. It is a legal requirement for every property for sale to have a valid EPC but if you’re in any doubt about the eco performance of any property you want to invest in, please ask us for advice.

  1.     Alternatively, you should be committed to making eco improvements

There is good news for investors who have found a high yielding property that happens to have an EPC of D or below. Some green buy-to-let mortgages are aimed specifically at investors willing to install upgrades to improve the home’s EPC rating. These incentives come in the form of cashback that can be spent on improvements, or a bridging loan that can be converted into a buy-to-let mortgage after work to improve the EPC rating is complete.

  1.     Now is a good time to take out a green mortgage

Whether you are making your first property investment, remortgaging a buy-to-let in your portfolio or are adding something new to your rental collection, considering a green mortgage now is a wise move. With the interest rate creeping up, any home loan that offers an advantage makes business sense, especially if it encourages landlords to install energy efficiency measures.

  1.     Green mortgages & EPC changes go hand-in-hand

The timing of green mortgages is critical, given the EPC changes that lie ahead. Landlords should be preparing now for 2025, when all new and renewing tenancies need to have a C EPC rating. This new standard will also apply to existing tenancies from 2028, and the mandatory expectation may even rise to a B by 2030.

Get in touch if you’re going green

Green mortgages should be the incentive you need to start making energy efficiency changes to a buy-to-let you own or intend to buy. From attractive interest rates and cashback to larger loan amounts to cover eco improvements, what’s not to like? We can help with planning and managing a more sustainable buy-to-let, so contact us today.

The eco improvements that add the most value

If there’s one agenda that won’t be pushed to the bottom of the pile, it’s the eco agenda. How much energy we use, where we get our energy from and what we can do to reduce our carbon footprint is a narrative that has become persistent in the property market.

While most of us acknowledge that building and running homes contributes to harmful emissions (it’s estimated that 40% of the UK’s carbon is emitted by households), the type of improvements that make the most positive contribution to a greener planet are sometimes the most intrusive – and expensive.

So where does this leave the homeowner who wants to improve their eco credentials but has potential plans to move in the near future?

The good news is adding energy efficiency measures may increase the value of your property and make your home more desirable to buyers when it comes to selling – on top of any gas and electricity savings you make while living in the property once any changes are made.

Which eco improvements add the most value? 

Rated People helpfully ranked 15 of the most common energy efficient home improvements in order of how much value they add to a property, as follows:

  1.     Solar panels – £13,512 (value increase)
  2.     Wind turbine – £12,941
  3.     Triple glazing – £12,788
  4.     Underfloor heating – £12,290
  5.     Ground source heat pump – £12,251
  6.     Double glazing – £12,005
  7.     Extra insulation, like cavity wall insulation – £11,764
  8.     Biomass boiler – £11,756
  9.     Air source heat pump – £11,670
  10.     Solar water heating – £11,646
  11.     Electric car charging point – £11,538
  12.     Green/living roof – £11,477
  13.     Biodiverse garden – £11,444
  14.     Old appliances replaced with new ones – £11,190
  15.     Draught proofing – £11,151

How much do the most popular eco improvements cost?

Air source heat pump: expect to pay in the region of £10,000 for the purchase and installation of an air source heat pump. This cost can be reduced significantly if homeowners act quickly. The ‘first come, first served’ Boiler Upgrade Scheme offered by the Government will reduce the bill by £5,000 and there’s zero VAT on the purchase of heat pumps until 2027. 

Verdict: you may just about break even when balancing added value with purchase/install costs but if you take advantage of the Boiler Upgrade Scheme and zero VAT, you’ll potentially add £5,000 in value.

Solar panels: figures will vary according to the size and type of your property, along with the model you opt for. As a general guide, the supply and installation of solar panels will set you back around £5,000–£10,000, although the purchase of the panels will be VAT free for the next five years. 

Verdict: install solar panels in the next five years to take advantage of zero VAT and this installation could add in the region of £5,000 to your home’s value.

Electric vehicle charging point: expect to pay anywhere between £800-£1,100 to buy and install an electric vehicle charging point at a domestic property. If you’re a homeowner who lives in a flat, you’ll be able to apply for the Government’s new ChargePoint grant, which offers a 75% discount on the cost of purchasing and installing a charging point, up to the value of £350.

Verdict: installing an electric vehicle charging point is by far the most lucrative eco improvement. An outlay of around £1,000 could see you add another £10,000 in value to your property.

If you are thinking of selling a property you own, contact the team for advice and a free valuation.